Blog Archives

Your Invincible Years are Over: how to stay strong, fit and pain free as you age

Old Superman #famousoldies

I used to beat the hell out of my body when I was in high school.  I played soccer, basketball, rugby and a variety of other sports on almost a daily basis.  I would bang and crash and hurt myself, but it never really slowed me down because I just took it for granted that within a few days or a few weeks my body would heal up and be ready for more.  In University I tested my body with little sleep, more sports and a lot more alcohol, but I still always bounced back and kept going.  Around my mid-twenties to early thirties a few things happened that started changing my perspective on life.

By the age of twenty four, I had completed two university degrees and was officially a registered physiotherapist.  I’d like to think I was a lot smarter after six years of university, but I learned much more in the following six to ten years than I ever did in school.  It was a time when my body seemed to start getting less and less invincible and I started gaining more and more perspective on the importance of physical health.  I still played soccer, hockey and squash, but my body started taking longer and longer to recover; things that used to take days to feel better, starting taking weeks and I was forced to consider the physical consequences of my activity choices more than ever.

As a physiotherapist, working with clients from nine to ninety years old, I started recognizing that I was not alone in the weakening of my invincibility around age thirty.  I would hear an average of ten ‘getting old sucks’ complaints a week, equally spread amongst the thirty, forty and fifty year-olds.  The sixty and seventy year-olds tended to phrase it more around ‘this old body is falling apart,’ and the eighty to ninety year-olds just seemed to be happy if something actually didn’t hurt.  Read More

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Getting Old Sucks: the march towards stenosis

Old
photo: susafri
My favourite part of being a physiotherapist is the perspective I gain by working with a broad array of people: young people, old people, active people, sedentary people, successful people and those just starting out.  I find it fascinating to try and see the world through these people’s eyes as I get little glimpses into their lives during our thirty minute appointments each week.  The relationships people have with their own bodies are a very curious thing to me.

Some people literally behave like their bodies are simply vehicles to walk their heads around; they have little to no awareness of how or what they are doing physically and are blinded by cognitive factors like stress and anxiety.  Others treat their body like a temple and seek help when they detect even the slightest change from their normal, homeostatic state.  Many people’s relationships with their bodies are a product of to their early childhood sports combined with their recent fitness endeavors.  Your early sport and movement experiences are responsible for molding your general postures while your more recent fitness endeavors will create the lens that you see your physical self through.

Some people choose personal trainers, others choose Yoga classes and some are determined to work out at home with programs like Foundation, or P90X.  Your choice of activity will affect your perception of what physical health means to you.  You may get focused on strength or flexibility or endurance or speed.  I see many people in my practice that were active teenagers, but are now in their early 40s with two kids and are trying to rediscover their bodies; unfortunately many people get hurt during this phase because their bodies are 10-20 years older than they physically remember and their choice of activity was based more on familiarity than need.

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Mindfulness: The skill of living in the present

Below is a great talk on the topic of mindfulness, or the ability to step back from your emotions and look at your thoughts and feelings in a more objective way.  The way we perceive the world is hugely affected by our past experiences and future expectations as is our perception of pain and sensation in our bodies.  Developing the skill of mindfulness is commonly the path out of chronic pain for many people.

Watch this 10 minute video below for an introduction to the concept.

See below the video for a link to a great book on the topic that dives deeper into the idea and the science behind it.

Mindsight: The new science of personal transformation

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Please feel free to leave questions or comments in the space below and I’d be happy to try my best to answer them.

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