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Case Study #1: How a 34-year-old physiotherapist overcame his foot, back, hip & knee issues

I get asked by my clients all the time: ‘what made you want to be a physio?’ So I figured I would make myself Case Study #1 in a series that I am writing to help you relate to pain, injury and rehabilitation in a realistic and practical way.  My short answer to clients is usually ‘I’ve been an active athlete my whole life and have always been very good at hurting myself so I spent my fair share of time in physio.  I was quite familiar with it and always had a fascination with the human body so it was a natural progression for me after my Human Kinetics degree to go into Physiotherapy.

This article will summarize the lessons I have learned from both hurting myself repeatedly and working with people in pain every day.  I will outline the path I took to overcome some chronic issues that are very common to people of all ages and the things I try to teach to both my parents and my kids.

Brief Background …

I tend to refer to your teens and twenties as your invincible years.  You can punish your body without experiencing that much consequence because the pain, stiffness and soreness doesn’t last long enough to deter you from doing the activity again, or to change your behaviour significantly.  I was a long, lanky kid that played a lot of soccer, rugby, baseball, track & field, water-skiing, wake-boarding, basketball and volleyball.  I sprained ankles, broke my wrist, and dislocated my shoulder many times, but I kept on going.  Now at 34, after being a physiotherapist for ten years, starting a business and having three kids in three years, I have come to realize that I am the cumulative product of everything I have done up to this point and that I better take care of my body because it’s the only one I’ve got for the next 60 years (Click here for related article). Read More

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How to strengthen your feet: advice and tools to get you started

You may go to the gym to strengthen your chest, back, legs or core, but what about your feet?  Your feet end up being held hostage in a stinky pair of shoes, unable to move or breathe all day and then you expect them to hold you up while you walk, run or play sports.  They are pretty durable, but will eventually begin to break down, hurt and even deform if you don’t give them a chance to work properly with the rest of your body.  Your feet are your body’s suspension; they act as both shock absorbers and rigid levers to help propel you when walking and running.  Losing awareness of your feet leads to poor movement patterns, poor posture and inevitably pain.

Imagine you have a job that requires you to wear tight leather socks on your hands all day.  Now imagine the palm side of the sock has a firm plank on it so you can’t flex your hand to properly grab anything, but you still have to use your hands all day.  What do you think would happen to your hands over time?  They would turn into deformed, weak clubs like most people’s feet end up looking like.  You would lose the dexterity in your fingers while your forearms, wrists and shoulders would get all tight from compensating all day; this is what effectively happens to most peoples toes, ankles and hips from wearing stiff shoes all day, but your feet have much more of an impact on your posture than your hands ever would.

Four facts about your feet that are hard to argue with:

  1. You were not born with shoes on…evolution designed your feet to function barefoot
  2. Your feet’s arches are designed to be held up by the muscular tension holding your foot bones together, not by external “arch supports” pushing them up from the bottom
  3. You likely wear shoes most of the time and walk mainly on very flat surfaces
  4. You are unlikely to stop wearing shoes, but would like to keep your feet warm, healthy, strong and protected

 

So you will probably agree that your feet would be happiest and strongest if you were barefoot all day walking around an uneven meadow, but practically that is not going to happen, so what do you do to keep your feet strong, living in reality? Read More

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