Blog Archives

Getting Old Sucks: the march towards stenosis

Old
photo: susafri
My favourite part of being a physiotherapist is the perspective I gain by working with a broad array of people: young people, old people, active people, sedentary people, successful people and those just starting out.  I find it fascinating to try and see the world through these people’s eyes as I get little glimpses into their lives during our thirty minute appointments each week.  The relationships people have with their own bodies are a very curious thing to me.

Some people literally behave like their bodies are simply vehicles to walk their heads around; they have little to no awareness of how or what they are doing physically and are blinded by cognitive factors like stress and anxiety.  Others treat their body like a temple and seek help when they detect even the slightest change from their normal, homeostatic state.  Many people’s relationships with their bodies are a product of to their early childhood sports combined with their recent fitness endeavors.  Your early sport and movement experiences are responsible for molding your general postures while your more recent fitness endeavors will create the lens that you see your physical self through.

Some people choose personal trainers, others choose Yoga classes and some are determined to work out at home with programs like Foundation, or P90X.  Your choice of activity will affect your perception of what physical health means to you.  You may get focused on strength or flexibility or endurance or speed.  I see many people in my practice that were active teenagers, but are now in their early 40s with two kids and are trying to rediscover their bodies; unfortunately many people get hurt during this phase because their bodies are 10-20 years older than they physically remember and their choice of activity was based more on familiarity than need.

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Posted in Blog, Education, Healthcare, Posture Tagged with: , , , ,
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Principles to follow when your back is sore

 

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Acute (Days 1-7)

  • Ask yourself “what have I done and do I need someone else’s help?”
  • If you have had an accident or acute injury, it is best to seek help
  • If you are concerned you may have broke something or need some medication to deal with intense pain: SEE YOUR DOCTOR
  • If it is not an emergency, but you need help with pain, function and mobility: SEE YOUR PHYSIOTHERAPIST FIRST, not your doctor
  • If you determine you don’t need help just yet, but your back is acutely sore:
  • Lie down on your back on a firm surface and ice your back for 15 minutes at a time every hour you are able to for the first 3 days
  • Start doing gentle pelvic rock movements to help your back from seizing up
  • Start doing gentle hip stretches on your back and pelvic rock movements on your hands and knees
  • Avoid soft couches and beds for the first week
  • Once the intensity of the pain has subsided start using heat and ice for days 3-5
  • Shift to just heat when you feel your problem is more stiffness than acute pain
  • Visit a physiotherapist if the pain has persisted more than a week

Sub- Acute (Days 8-90)

  • Ask yourself “why did this happen and what am I doing to make it worse?”
  • Seek to understand the root cause of your problem by referring to the Why Backs Hurt and discussing what you’ve learned with your physiotherapist
  • Consider how repeated daily tasks like sitting, standing, breathing, walking and lifting may be contributing factors
  • Consider what type of treatment is most appropriate for you:
  • Massage Therapy, Osteopathy, Visceral Release, Craniosacral
  • Chiropractic, Active Release Technique, Spinal Decompression
  • Pilates, Yoga, Basic Fitness, Strength & Conditioning
  • Start to create more body awareness about how you may have been compensating for the pain you have been experiencing for the past week to month
  • Look at your posture and alignment in a mirror
  • Pay attention to how you are breathing
  • Try to note your pain patterns (i.e.
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Posted in Blog, Healthcare, Low Backs, Mid Backs Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,
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Basic Low Back Anatomy

Here is my YouTube video outlining the basic relevant and functional anatomy of the low back using an anatomical model.

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Posted in Anatomy, Blog, Low Backs Tagged with: , , , , , , ,
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